Thursday, May 8, 2014

Technological Drowning

No matter how many times you submit your college application you will be turned down, unless you clean up your Facebook page. Colleges do care about what high schoolers are doing on Facebook. High schoolers are too open with their profiles. We as a county need to be sure that children have a good future set ahead of them. Many people are either unaware of this or too ignorant to realize this is how colleges get information on prospective students. So as I will ask many times, why? Why put so much in the public world? I do not think people really know. Colleges really do care about what high schoolers are doing on Facebook because they do not want a person with a bad digital footprint to be attending their school.


I think that Facebook affects the acceptance 
process because if admission committees are unsure about a student they will search them so they can make an educated guess. The executive director of K-12 and college prep programs at Kaplan Test Prep, Christine Brown said, “Students’ social media and digital footprint can sometimes play a role in the admissions process. It’s something that is becoming more ubiquitous and less looked down upon.” If colleges find possibly troublesome things online they are likely not to tell the student that said or did it. “As students’ use of social media is growing, there’s a whole variety of ways that college admissions officers can use it,” Beth Wiser, the director of admissions at the University of Vermont said in an interview. In her opinion she is absolutely right. People are too lenient on what is out in the open. Why put so much out there when the future of students is relying on being accepted? 


Approximately 29 percent looked on Facebook as part of their applicant-review process. Approximately 38 percent of those doing so in 2013 compared with approximately 12 percent in 2011 found material that negatively impacted their view of a student. Although, 29 percent is not a large percent, it is growing at an increased rate. However, there are a lot of people finding negative material. In only two years the amount of students denied acceptance has increased by 26 percent These numbers are not very large but they are growing rapidly, if they grew 26 percent in two years by, 2015 these number will be nearly 55 percent. However this will not happen because Facebook is already growing unpopular with teenagers, because their parents are on it so it is not as kid based as it was three years ago.


In conclusion, the answer to my question, why? College admittance uses old Facebook posts from before the age of parents on Facebook because they get to know the person when they were younger and predict what they will be like in the future. Also they get more information about who the prospective student really is like outside of their college essay. Colleges do care about what high schoolers are doing on Facebook. High schoolers are too open with their profiles, Americans need to be more aware of what students are doing online and how to use the internet more wisely.

see bibliography here
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Conclusion updated: May 28,2014

Writing this page has been an exciting project. First I had to find several resources to pull information from that was by far the hardest. Then I started writing after several very rough, rough drafts, I thought it was finally ready. I chose this topic because as a high school student my biggest concern right now is how am I going to get into college? And am I doing it right? I also chose this because it interests me and that is probable the main reason why I chose it. I think that my opinion changed slightly as I was researching, my opinion did not change drastically it only got more focused. This happened when I was talking to a friend who had just decided to apply to her dream college. I shared what I had learned with her and she changed all of her privacy settings and even her name on Facebook so that it would be a lot harder to find out information. My opinion before I told her these things was “when applying for colleges you should go through and clear out everything that could harm your chances” but after talking to her and seeing that she got accepted I changed to “when applying for colleges you should go and clean up your profile but you do not need to change your whole profile” I changed to this because colleges need to see the real person not the perfect student and person in the words of Hannah Montana “Nobody’s perfect”.  If you try to hard to change your whole Facebook you look fake people know how to spot fake people. I did not discover any other resources that I did not use in my post.
-Maddie

10 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Hi Maddie! You have raised a definite concern for high schoolers and, in some cases, younger children, who post too much personal information and questionable behavior via their social networking accounts. I suspect that even as Facebook may be decreasing in popularity, there are other social sites--Twitter, Vine, Instagram and so on, that are used to publicize personal information on the web. Did you get any sense from your research that colleges are going beyond Facebook [and Google] to get a better idea of the character of applicants? Do you think that some of the information that they find actually helps put the applicants in a positive light? Thank you, Maddie, for alerting students to the possible effects of their online activity.--Ms. Riches

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    1. Hi Ms. Riches
      I did feel that there are better ways to get information on perspective students. However I do not think colleges have caught up to that yet but they are being more aware in the rising digital media "superpowers" that are not only Facebook but Instagram, Vine, and Snapchat. I do think there is some information that helps students, for example, If someone post something about a getting a high grade on a test that might benefit the student.

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  3. A great caution to high school students to watch not only what they post on Facebook, but also other social media sites - from Twitter, Instagram, Google+, Vine, and even SnapChat. Do students know that SnapChat photos can be recalled and restored? We often over share because we believe the Internet is 'private' or can be made 'private'. However, we never read the Terms and Conditions, which give companies full access and license to share any content posted. Great article!

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    1. Hi,
      I personally am aware that Snapchats can be restored. However most people are not which I find shocking privacy on the internet should be taken very, very seriously. A lot of people feel this way but do not change how they protect themselves.

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  4. Wow! I did not know that colleges looked at Facebook profiles when deciding who to let in. I think this article gives a lot of awareness to teens and children about what they should be posting on Facebook and who's looking at it. However, I don't think its right for colleges to judge a person based on what they posted when they were a lot younger. I think a way to make that more fare would be if colleges just looked at postings in a two year range. I'm curious about what other cites colleges check too - like snap chat, twitter,..etc. Great article!

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    1. Hi,
      As far as I know colleges look at twitter and Facebook the most. However some of the smaller private colleges look at Instagram, Vine and Youtube most do not though. Thank You!

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  5. This is a great wake up call to all of the high schoolers out there that don't make the best decisions on Facebook and a great warning to people to people who have not made any bad decisions on Facebook. It is very understandable that collages look at the Facebooks of incoming students to predict how they will act at their school. Although, everyone makes mistakes they should still know not to put "everything out their" for people to see. Do you think collages take into consideration that people do make mistakes or find one bad thing and automatically discard their application.

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    1. Hi,
      I would assume that it is not one bad decision that makes or breaks a students dream of attending that school, depending on the scale of the decision. I do think that they would understand a mistake or two. But I am really not sure thats just my best guess. Thank You

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  6. Hey Maddie,
    I had no idea that colleges were doing that! That is really helpful information. Your article was great, it was short and got right to the punch. It was fun to read and kind of surprised me about what colleges do. Personally, I'm really careful about what I put on Facebook because when I got my Facebook my parents were already on it. I do think having your parents see your Facebook page does impact teenagers on what they share. I understand why colleges would look at your Facebook page, but I just never thought about it like that before. It makes me wonder what else they look at?

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